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Topic Title: Kettle Failure.
Topic Summary: So sad.
Created On: 16 March 2019 08:13 am
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 16 March 2019 08:13 am
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Zoomup

Posts: 6117
Joined: 20 February 2014

Yesterday my old Russell Hobbs K2 kettle died on me. Oh I thought, I have a spare one in the loft. I did but it had a bad switch assembly and was also faulty. I made one good working model from the two faulty ones. I had one good element and one good auto switch assembly. I then looked to buy some spares like a new switch assembly and a new element. Oh woe is me. The parts are now unavailable. I do have a new element somewhere but can't find it. It got lost in the move. New elements were available about 5 years ago but not now. I have ordered a used K2 kettle from fleabay to serve as an emergency spare, but I would like to get a spare element and switch assembly if possible.

Anybody got one please?

Video of K2 kettle nerd. It could be me.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eGjaa3ZaOnY


Z.
 17 March 2019 01:26 am
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potential

Posts: 1774
Joined: 01 February 2007

There are some on eBay.
I had a couple of k2s over the years.
Both took longer and longer to switch themselves off over their life.
The main problem for me was that occasionally the vent in the lid would be positioned in such a way that steam would catch my hand.
I'm left-handed, my wife is right-handed which may have had something to do with it.
The legs tended to crumble away eventually.
Compared to the average kettle at the time changing the element was far from easy.
Most other kettles had a metal or plastic collar/nut holding their element in place and was a 10 second job to change.
Don't forget that by the time the K2 appeared most kettle elements had a boil-dry safety system in place within the element where the plug fitted.
A sprung-loaded thermal-operated plunger/rod would push the plug right out of its socket.
The plunger could be pushed back and reset once the kettle had cooled down.
 17 March 2019 08:24 am
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ebee

Posts: 6735
Joined: 02 December 2004

professor zoomblast,
why get one of those expensive kettles or elements?

Why not get a modern common or garden kettle? those made in taiwan jobs are only £5 to £10 each , bargain!
Mind you the airfare to taiwan costs a bit but you could have a holiday whilst there, so win win.

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 17 March 2019 09:18 am
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Zoomup

Posts: 6117
Joined: 20 February 2014

Originally posted by: ebee

professor zoomblast,

why get one of those expensive kettles or elements?



Why not get a modern common or garden kettle? those made in taiwan jobs are only £5 to £10 each , bargain!

Mind you the airfare to taiwan costs a bit but you could have a holiday whilst there, so win win.



Hello ebee,
the kettle is like me, mature in years. We are friends. I like it because it has a metal body. God knows what leaches out of the Taiwanese plastic kettles into your drinking water when you boil the water to make tea. Also being I'm a maintenance electrician I like keeping things going, it is very satisfying. I like to eat Taiwanese food though even if I can't afford the air fare.

Bye,

Z.
 17 March 2019 09:23 am
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Zoomup

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Joined: 20 February 2014

Hello Potential,
there is a special hollow tube tool for removing the K2s locking rings at the bottom of the switch assembly. The locking rings are flat with a slot in them. They screw onto a threaded stud. The special tool allows the unscrewing of the threaded locking rings. I lost my special tool, so recently went to a model shop and bought some hollow brass tube. I will make a new tool for the job. The washers are still available on fleabay for sealing the element to the kettle body to keep the water in. I am a real K2 Nerd.

Z.
 17 March 2019 09:43 am
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potential

Posts: 1774
Joined: 01 February 2007

Ah, yes.
In your explanation you've reminded me of the purpose of the small home-made tool I came across in my old-unused-and-dead-tools-but-too-good-to-throw-away toolbox when looking for repair and dismantling inspiration a few months ago.
 17 March 2019 12:25 pm
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chrispearson

Posts: 1095
Joined: 15 February 2018

That K2 has two inadequacies: (1) it's slow; (2) it cannot be used to boil only one mug of water.

The problem with most modern kettles is that they have an aperture so that one can see the level of water, and they fail after only a few years.

Our latest kettle calls itself Sage and remains satisfactory after some years.
 17 March 2019 08:17 pm
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Zoomup

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Joined: 20 February 2014

Originally posted by: chrispearson

That K2 has two inadequacies: (1) it's slow; (2) it cannot be used to boil only one mug of water.



The problem with most modern kettles is that they have an aperture so that one can see the level of water, and they fail after only a few years.



Actually Chris the K2's element is very low down in the kettle, just above the base actually, and this allows just one mug of water to be boiled. The speed is quite fast as well with tap water straight from the tap. I have not noticed any delay in boiling, about two minutes or less for just one mug. Some K2s have given over 30 years service.

Z,
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