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Topic Title: Drilling through joists etc..
Topic Summary: Tapered auger bits?
Created On: 15 March 2019 02:59 PM
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 15 March 2019 02:59 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 2810
Joined: 14 December 2006

Has anyone tried those tapered augur bits for drilling through joists etc.., if so, are they any good?

I'm still with conventional auger bits, which are fine, but have the disadvantage that the waste material bunches up along the bit slowing the drill down.

I've tried a three pronged affair in the past which was as much use as a chocolate teapot. I find that flat bits are not much good for joist drilling either.

Mike
 15 March 2019 05:22 PM
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Zoomup

Posts: 6117
Joined: 20 February 2014

Good quality flat wood bits at a fast speed work for me. But they have to be hard metal and of good quality. If blunt they burn the wood. If new they work a treat.

Z.
 15 March 2019 05:24 PM
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dustydazzler

Posts: 3068
Joined: 19 January 2016

Generally use a flat bit

I do own several long auger bits but rarely see the light of day anymore
 16 March 2019 11:41 AM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 17795
Joined: 13 August 2003

For me a stubby auger in a right-angle drill for joists. Not sure what you mean by a tapered auger - any links?
- Andy.
 16 March 2019 07:56 PM
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chrispearson

Posts: 1095
Joined: 15 February 2018

Originally posted by: AJJewsbury

Not sure what you mean by a tapered auger - any links?


I wonder whether Mike is referring to the four-sided tapers which fit an old-fashioned carpenter's brace?

If so, nothing wrong with them, but they don't fit in a three-jawed chuck. A ratchet (corner) brace is useful for getting between joists.
 16 March 2019 08:00 PM
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perspicacious

Posts: 8055
Joined: 18 April 2006

but they don't fit in a three-jawed chuck

They will if you cut off the end!

Regards

BOD
 16 March 2019 08:10 PM
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perspicacious

Posts: 8055
Joined: 18 April 2006

I've got a Z Brierley drill grinder that'll do up to Morse No 3 (32 mm) so I am spoiled by using HSS drills that I've turned down the shank to 13 mm. These are great so long as you clear the "swarf". Even though, shot fired nails take the edge off if you do catch them, but easily re-ground.

Regards

BOD
 16 March 2019 10:01 PM
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mikejumper

Posts: 2810
Joined: 14 December 2006

Originally posted by: AJJewsbury
Not sure what you mean by a tapered auger - any links?

- Andy.

I'm not sure if there's a generic name for them, I've seen them called quad cutters, Irwin do a range which they call: 'Irwin Blue Groove Wood Drill Bit'.

It's possible they may need a bit more pressure than conventional augur bits to keep going.
 16 March 2019 11:10 PM
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chrispearson

Posts: 1095
Joined: 15 February 2018

Originally posted by: mikejumper

I'm not sure if there's a generic name for them, I've seen them called quad cutters, Irwin do a range which they call: 'Irwin Blue Groove Wood Drill Bit'.


These?

I haven't tried them, but the brand is reputable, so I imagine that they will be fine.
 16 March 2019 11:19 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 12039
Joined: 22 July 2004

maybe - but they do have 3 cutting teeth, and the only thing tapered is the centre screw. Not used them, but the reviews suggest they are good.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 16 March 2019 11:20 PM
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rocknroll

Posts: 9677
Joined: 03 October 2005

They used to be called a Beaver Bit at one time where they taper towards the shank the idea being better chip clearance than conventional ones, only worked a little bit better than a auger or flat bit, the problem is you the drill and the bit are trying to remove as much wood as you can and 25 or 32 is a lot to shift and can be stressful on the tools, unless you peck drill the chips will burn and overheat your bit, although I don't do joists like you do I often drill large holes in 4 or 5 inch wood and my method is first I drill it with a 10 or 13mm cobalt drill bit which is so sharp it only takes seconds then drill with an auger, the wood has now broken the grain at the hole so chip clearance is much better so you don't get overheating.

Regards

-------------------------
"Take nothing but a picture,
leave nothing but footprints!"
-------------------------
"Oh! The drama of it all."
-------------------------
"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
-------------------------

Edited: 17 March 2019 at 09:56 AM by rocknroll
 17 March 2019 08:39 AM
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ebee

Posts: 6735
Joined: 02 December 2004

I have tried augers but am mostly a flat bit ter these days.
Angle drils not used because the cheaper ones strip easily. and with a long flat bit/extension bars most joists can be holecut on a nearly true axis anyway

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 17 March 2019 12:36 PM
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chrispearson

Posts: 1095
Joined: 15 February 2018

I might try one of those Irwin augers. I have just been drilling some holes in floorboards for CH pipes and it is difficult not to splinter the edges of the hole with a conventional auger which has a tangential cutter on one side and a flat bit on the other. If there are three tangential cutters, then presumably the edges of the hole are cut cleanly before the chips are cut away.

As far as chip removal is concerned, it is hardly difficult to reverse a bit to clear the chips and then continue.
 17 March 2019 02:58 PM
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Grobbyman

Posts: 378
Joined: 14 August 2005

Have a look at the Milwaukee tapered auger bits.
They really are tapered and and self cleaning.
Best I've found so far.
George
 18 March 2019 01:06 AM
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MHRestorations

Posts: 83
Joined: 22 October 2017

The auger mapj posted is one we use for larger holes. (SWA through substantial timbers for example). It simply ignores the wood entirely and just goes on and on. A bit pricey but WELL worth it.

For flat bits, I prefer Bosch flat bits with the screw entry
 18 March 2019 08:27 AM
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Zoomup

Posts: 6117
Joined: 20 February 2014

For larger holes I have even used a circular hole saw for a nice clean hole through wooden joists. A slow speed is required and regular cooling of the saw blade.

Z.
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