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Topic Title: The slow death of G.C.H
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Created On: 13 March 2019 04:30 pm
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 13 March 2019 04:30 pm
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dustydazzler

Posts: 3068
Joined: 19 January 2016

 13 March 2019 06:32 pm
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Zoomup

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So, what about gas fired electrical generating power stations?

Z.
 13 March 2019 06:54 pm
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chrispearson

Posts: 1095
Joined: 15 February 2018

if new housing was replacing old housing, the country's gas consumption could fall quite quickly, but I suspect that new housing is required for immigrants and the tendency to have ever smaller families. However, I suppose that they have to make a start somewhere. I find it remarkable how little fuel some houses need to keep warm, which is great for the distant future, but how long will some of the houses that we see on the TV last?
 13 March 2019 08:04 pm
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broadgage

Posts: 3170
Joined: 07 August 2007

Originally posted by: Zoomup

So, what about gas fired electrical generating power stations?

Z.


Cant see them vanishing anytime soon.
I would however hope that enough renewable capacity is built to relegate gas burning power stations to peak load rather than base load.

The proposals to discourage or prohibit GCH for new homes will include improved insulation and perhaps heat recovery so as to much reduce the heating load.
It is likely that heating demand could be eliminated in milder winter weather, and reduced to 1 or 2 Kw in severe weather.

I know of a very large off grid house, 9 bedroom, with very low energy use.
Energy input PER YEAR is about 50 Kg of bottled gas, and about a ton of firewood and about 20 Mwh of home generated renewable electricity. And an unknown contribution from solar thermal for summer hot water.
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