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Topic Title: Can you help me find a gland
Topic Summary: to fit a 40mm diameter stainless steel flexi conduit
Created On: 19 January 2019 02:27 PM
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 19 January 2019 02:27 PM
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Zs

Posts: 3877
Joined: 20 July 2006

Hello,

I'm making something. It is a lamp. The plan in my head is that it will be a totally minimalist, sort of ikebana inspired arrangement of some tubes of light on a beautiful wooden block.

I went to see an advisor on CE marking and insurance etc about them this week. I'm now ready to start making. Sadly, the prototype in my head and on the bench is having its first 'iteration' and I don't want to budge on something.

I have sourced some beautiful stainless steel flexi conduit which has an outer diameter of 40mm. I got it because the guys who have been using it for years are finding it impossible to get glands for it and a pain to work with compared to, well, inferior stuff and of course I thought it would be easy to find cosmetic connections. Famous last thoughts? I've had it cut to length by a professional so it is immaculately level. Any engineer will appreciate this stuff, it is tactile, subtly glossy and has a great 'build quality' feel.

The wood base is on the way from Germany and is being cut to size for me. Expensive, but a tight grain so that it will withstand the hole cutting without going tatty at the edges.

Still need a Trumpf N200 nibbler though.....

Anyway, I want to mount the flexi conduit to the block with a stainless steel version of an armoured cable gland or similar. So, I've been fettling with whatever I can get my hands on to try the sizes.

Do any of you have a reference for conduit or cable connections which is by the diameter or any suggestions?

Electrical wholesalers and I tried a 32 SWA gland and a 40 SWA gland. The 32 went inside the tube but no chance of getting the nuts round it of course. The 40 fitted really well but the outer nut also didn't go round the outer of the tube. I think maybe glands aren't sold by the cable diameter in mm? I've always bought them by the number of cores and core CSA. They suggested a plumbers merchant so I went to one this morning. Yes, a 40mm waste compression connection fits perfectly. That's the best result to date. Of course I'm not looking for plastic, nor a through joint.

So, I'm looking for advice on how to purchase glands to fit a tube, not a cable.

Any help available from you?

Zs
 19 January 2019 02:40 PM
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KFH

Posts: 799
Joined: 06 November 2010

These people do lots of SS fittings, no idea if any of them fit your requirements. https://www.nero.co.uk
Good luck

Kevin
 19 January 2019 03:17 PM
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Fm

Posts: 2032
Joined: 24 August 2011

As it's a one off,speak to someone with a cnc machine and get something bespoke
 19 January 2019 03:26 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 12039
Joined: 22 July 2004

Might be worth looking at American or refrigeration plumbing - where half inch pipe actually is half inch OD, rather than a UK "half inch" pipe which is 15mm OD, because the original lead pipe had a half inch ID. 40mm is 1 5/8 inch plus a bit of wiggle.

You can solder or even weld S/S of course and you can split the olives in compression fittings where you don't need the watertightness,

The 40 fitted really well but the outer nut also didn't go round the outer of the tube.
Do you have access to a lathe ? Turning a bit out of the nut may be possible if its just a fraction mm needed.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 19 January 2019 03:43 PM
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AJJewsbury

Posts: 17795
Joined: 13 August 2003

This kind of thing perhaps? http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/cable-glands/8319043/ (even if it's nickel plated rather than stainless)
- Andy.
 19 January 2019 04:05 PM
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Fm

Posts: 2032
Joined: 24 August 2011

Is this a fitting with a 2/5/13amp plug or hardwired?
 19 January 2019 04:39 PM
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ebee

Posts: 6735
Joined: 02 December 2004

Something bespoke Zs.
A bloke or blokess with a hobby engineering workshop or a commercial backstreet engineering shop or best of all ask a friendly tutor of your local college in the engineering section if one can be set as a student phase test you might get a few that way.
Depends how many you want of course and how much you might have to pay.

Third world craftsmen might be glad of such especially if you pay well above the local going rate

-------------------------
Regards,
Ebee (M I S P N)

Knotted cables cause Lumpy Lektrik
 19 January 2019 05:29 PM
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Cremeegg

Posts: 711
Joined: 13 July 2007

Seem to recall you had some dealings with some model railway folk a while back. Amongst them you'll probably find several skilled engineers that might make their own engines etc on their lathes. Brother in laws club has some guys that do little else in their fantastic sheds. Time to call in a few favours maybe.
 19 January 2019 06:45 PM
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markwatson

Posts: 34
Joined: 26 May 2006

How about something like this: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/40-mm-Flexible-Steel-Conduit-Kopex-Gland-/223072826580
Or you mentioned plumbing waste compression fittings, you can get those in a chrome finish, could you use a straight coupling with one end fixed to the box and the conduit in the other?

-------------------------
sparkymark
 19 January 2019 10:16 PM
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Zs

Posts: 3877
Joined: 20 July 2006

Greetings from the shed.

Those are superb suggestions and for a tenner I'm going to take a punt on the eBay ones. Thank you Mark. Even Andy's at about £50 a pop are more in league than the £130 ones I've had a look at. I'm concerned about the fit so I'll get one from Ebay and see if it fits first. If it comes out nice then I've enough of the conduit for several and each one needs three glands. I'm still on prototype right now so one will do.

We do have a guy at work who manufactures precision components for us. His workshop is awesome and he is the last of his kind there apart from a young apprentice. I swear that on a Monday morning he has a queue of 'enthusiasts' waiting for him to arrive - each one with something non-work related secreted in their pocket if you get my drift? He measured a bolt for me recently and replicated it exactly to replace an old worn out part. He told me what it was in what sounded like a foreign tongue. True craftsman. I rather envy his apprentice to be honest and I saw a 2 inch cube of brass which he has been taught how to turn on a lathe. Each face has the most intricate stepped cut out, like a threaded cone, and there is a perfect loose sphere in the heart of it. Amazing. I have vowed not to use company time or money on my own projects but I sure as hell steal inspiration from them. My note book is full of manufacturer details from pots of resin/glands/connectors/resistors/perspex tube and so on, which I encounter almost daily.

The railway club are still great friends so that's a good call too. They need a switch changing so I'll get over there before the 06.45 from Chalfont crashes into the 06.47 from Amersham and ask.

Maybe I need to add a lathe to my shopping list and do some of this myself?! I fear it would take too long to learn though.

Keeping you posted and thank you,

Zs
 20 January 2019 12:16 AM
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mapj1

Posts: 12039
Joined: 22 July 2004

Maybe worth considering actually , given the tools you can already use, a the use of a manual lathe for hand feeding the tools and chuck work would be quickly picked up. There are some subtleties like using flat top tools for brass dry, and raked ones wet for steel, but apart from that it is all about remembering to keep the speed at the tool tip constant , so slowing for large diameter work. But it is a pricey lump for one project, so if you can, try and get a flying lesson and then borrow time on someone else's - offering to replace the tool bit usually relieves some of the nervousness on the part of the owner. I have and use a lathe that is older than myself, and both the kids can use it too, (and its a lot safer now my son no longer has to stand on the box of rat poison to get high enough, and he was turning up little wheels to belt drive a music box mechanism over the Christmas hols.) The point I'm making is that yes the toolroom machinists are/were a breed apart, and produce great things on a power fed turret lathe, but you don't need to be that experienced or have a full size machine to produce some useful parts pretty quickly.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 20 January 2019 07:42 AM
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Fm

Posts: 2032
Joined: 24 August 2011

Find a local makerspace

I know to didn't want plastic, but what about something 3D printed?
 20 January 2019 11:27 AM
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rocknroll

Posts: 9677
Joined: 03 October 2005

I suspect you have 304 stainless steel conduit with a popular size of 1 1/2" (40mm), one of the best markets for stainless steel and fittings is India they sell a lot of the stuff so some internet searching should show some results.

I you are ever in the market for a lathe then you wont go far wrong with a Colchester Student, I bought mine 27 years ago s/h for £600 it will do everything you need like indexing, thread cutting etc; and there are always parts for this model available all the time on ebay etc;

I spent the first two and half years of my apprenticeship in engineering and learned how to use lathes, milling machines etc; even did two C&G's electrical and mechanical engineering before I sodded off for a better life, 3D printing is one option in a plastic material like polycarbonate, nylon or carbon fibre filled but that would depend on the use and environment the gland is in, you certainly could have it printed in metal using a process called DLMS 'direct laser metal sintering' but that would be costly for design and manufacture at the moment.

There is a place in London which might be worth a visit that offer I believe various 3D printing services and just a visit might enlighten you on what the future beholds, they are call iMakr, 17 Wells St, Fitzrovia, London W1T 3PD

If your goal is to become a maker and designer then a 3D printer becomes a valuable tool in your arsenal, not only does it serve to make functional parts but essential in rapid prototyping, you could spend weeks making something that your customer wants changing so more weeks are lost, a few hours in CAD then printing out the item and a bit of post processing is all it takes, if changes are needed then back to CAD change a few lines and print again, post process and show the customer, you have your prototype the customer likes so make it, all is well easy saves a lot of time, I have a number of printers ranging from £3.5k to £100 so if you need help with a choice or even technical assistance you have my email, as I say a trip to iMakr will blow your mind a bit when you see what the possibilities are for a designer today.

Regards

-------------------------
"Take nothing but a picture,
leave nothing but footprints!"
-------------------------
"Oh! The drama of it all."
-------------------------
"You can throw all the philosophy you like at the problem, but at the end of the day it's just basic electrical theory!"
-------------------------

Edited: 20 January 2019 at 12:44 PM by rocknroll
 20 January 2019 03:57 PM
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chrispearson

Posts: 1095
Joined: 15 February 2018

Originally posted by: Zs

Maybe I need to add a lathe to my shopping list and do some of this myself?! I fear it would take too long to learn though.


I don't quite know how anybody can cope without a lathe - definitely a dessert island disc thing for me.

Toolmaking is a different thing altogether, but basic turning isn't particularly difficult and of course you learn as you go along.

The advantage of turning up a prototype yourself is that you can change it as you go along. If you give somebody else a design, either you get what you put on paper, or somebody else's idea of what it should be.
 20 January 2019 04:14 PM
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John Peckham

Posts: 9097
Joined: 23 April 2005

Chris

I agree I am a Myford Super 7 man myself. Don't use it much but a nice to have along with the pillar drill.

-------------------------
John Peckham

http://www.astutetechnicalservices.co.uk/
 20 January 2019 06:06 PM
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mapj1

Posts: 12039
Joined: 22 July 2004

That cube in cube thing is impressive, but as with the woodworking equivalent, the magic is in the hook shaped tool, and in being able to not cock-up the measurements which I presume is why it is a good test piece.. 40minute film in youtube, where else The chap cuts his own lathe tool.

-------------------------
regards Mike
 20 January 2019 10:27 PM
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paulskyrme

Posts: 1364
Joined: 12 February 2003

Zs,
For stainless flexible conduit & end fittings to match in nominal 40mm look no further than Flexicon, UK made:
https://www.flexicon.uk.com/en/?action=conduitdetail&cid=SSU&type=metallic

Also, you didn't need to look too far for CE marking consulting either, I'm pretty much doing more of that than anything else these days, it's what I was up near your work doing a few months ago!
 21 January 2019 07:17 PM
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AncientMariner

Posts: 904
Joined: 14 December 2004

For skill with hand tools, have a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MgnlbDVuPdg The way he produces a straight cut using a piercing saw amazed me, let along the finished item. WOW!
Clive.

-------------------------
Clive S Carver GCGI IEng MIET MITP
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